K-Pop — Dreamcatcher Recall

A Dreamcatcher Concert, Christmas vLive, And Long-Awaited Collab In December

Dreamcatcher continues to roll through mid-December 2020 with appearances both present and future and a surprise collaboration that’s been long-expected.

The holiday is creeping ever-so-closer, but Dreamcatcher continues to roll forward with more activities to squeeze in before everyone celebrates, as best they can, Christmas and New Year’s. The past week kicked off with an online concert appearance exclusively on the TikTok app for Dreamcatcher for Simply K-Pop’s end-of-year event.

The girls joined with artists such as ACE, LOONA, VeriVeri, and more to entertain fans at least one more time before year’s end. Simple K-Pop’s Periscope account has put up the first part of the concert to re-broadcast it, and the hope is that we’ll see the second part, featuring Dreamcatcher, on that same account in the coming days. In case you missed it, Dreamcatcher performed both “Scream” and “BOCA”, talked with a few very lucky fans, and played a couple of fun games including an entertaining “would you rather” variant. Overall it was another chance for Dreamcatcher to appear together and perform for fans.

That, however, will not be the last time Dreamcatcher has committed to being in front of their fans. The official Dreamcatcher vLive channel announced a pre-Christmas event for, well, a few hours after I post this article (6pm KST on 12/21/20) and it will feature Dreamcatcher wishing their fans an early Christmas, answering some questions submitted by fans, and then sending those lucky fans something that they’ll have made on the broadcast. We’ve seen the members making things for the fans before (in this case it was crafts for fans for the fan cafe) so fans are likely looking forward to what they have in store. Let’s just hope it isn’t like the time they tried to make dalgona on a broadcast.

The main news that came out this week, however, extended beyond Dreamcatcher and into a collaboration that fans have been waiting to happen for quite some time. Cube and Dreamcatcher Company were able to do what was needed in order to allow CLC and Dreamcatcher’s main dancers Seungyeon and SuA to collaborate on a short special clip to Masego’s “Tadow (Featuring FKJ)”. The result is one minute and thirty seconds of displaying just why both women occupy the Main Dancer role in their respective groups, especially when you consider the choreography is original and also constructed by them.

It’s important to note, in case you weren’t aware, that this collaboration didn’t come out of nowhere. Dreamcatcher and CLC have been close with each other for close to two years now, ever since a happenstance assignment to the same dressing room during promotions for “PIRI” in early 2019 put them together. The result was a couple of Dreamcatcher Notes where the two groups bonded over a few fun sessions with a lie detector device, establishing a private group chat, and several members from both groups forging some closer personal friendships (aside from Seungyeon and SuA, CLC’s Elkie and Handong, both the Chinese-born members of their groups, are reported to be close as well).

For Seungyeon and SuA, this was a collaboration that both of them had long wanted to do. SuA was quoted as wanting to do one with Seungyeon as recently as May of this year, and Seungyeon herself answered a question about who she wanted to do a collaboration with on her Instagram with a selfie of her and SuA. Collaborations oftentimes are pipe dreams, no matter how close the groups are, because of the logistics involved as well as both representing companies having to agree. But in this case, Cube Entertainment and Dreamcatcher Company got the job done, and the results speak for themselves (the video, as of this writing amassed a pretty impressive near-300k views in the first two days alone, which considering both groups’ relative popularity is nice).

Personally, it’s no surprise that I approve of this collaboration — not just for the talent on display, but that I’m drawn to “underdog” groups — CLC, like Dreamcatcher, is almost criminally underexposed when compared to groups from larger companies or followings, and one can only hope this opens the door for more for both groups (I’d love to see Handong and Elkie on a multi-lingual collaboration, or rappers Yeeun and Dami put something together). It can only benefit both of them.

Other than this, we got a couple of other little news tidbits — the first of these being we heard just a little bit of a sneak preview of Dreamcatcher’s upcoming first anime OP, “Eclipse”, for the King Raid’s anime, of which the OP version is supposed to be released right on Christmas. You can kind of hear what I think is SuA, then Yoohyeon, then Siyeon anchoring the pre-chorus and chorus respectively, and if even the anime OP version of this track is anything to go off of, it is going to carry Dreamcatcher’s signature rock sound. Lots of fans, myself included, can’t wait for this track to drop.

Dreamcatcher also continued to rack up recognition from publications online this past week, including:

  • South China Morning Post recognizes Dreamcatcher’s “Dystopia: The Tree of Language” as one of 2020’s top 15 K-pop group albums.
  • Paper Magazine puts Dreamcatcher’s 2020 track “Scream” at number 32 for the 40 best K-pop tracks of 2020.
  • Dazed Magazine rates Dreamcatcher’s “Scream” at number 6 for its own top 40 K-pop songs of 2020.

These little bits, from legitimate publications with long histories as well as work with other companies, continue to solidify Dreamcatcher’s increasing visibility and popularity in the K-Pop space as December (and 2020) draws to a close. While on many levels this has been a challenging year for everyone, the K-Pop industry included, seeing Dreamcatcher thrive in spite of this and stay (from all accounts) financially solid and increase their following is an encouraging sign as we head in the holidays and, of course, the last couple of recaps for 2020. See you then!

Lifetime geek dual-wielding in the tech and games industries for over a decade. Builder of walls of text. Shameless Asian pop lover.